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Username: Noogle
Joined: 16 Aug 2004
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Noogle's Recent Forum Posts
Can someone clear this up for me: how can it be an Intel CPU with a x86 style clock speed when it's a RISC processor? Because if that's the CPU speed, it's a bit low - consider that the 360 has to last at least 4 years as a gaming machine.
That's an impressive review for a game that requires little more from you than hold in X and steer your bike. The soundtrack is so-so and in comparison to other extreme sports titles, such as SSX Tricky, this one falls well short. I don't know any extreme sports fans who stuck with this one - in fact, one gave it back less than an hour after getting it.

It might be fun for beginners, but serious fans of sports sims or racing games can give this one a miss.
armageddon12 wrote
Real professional. No really. icon_shifty.gif
Yes, I know. Call it a moment of where emotion beat professionalism. But I couldn't compound my feeling about this situation otherwise than resorting to swearing.

Quote
Anyway, the point is they were remaking the game, but making it better than the original. Look at the Resident Evil remake, it was updated for a new generation and sold well. Remaking Duke Nukem 3D using the Source engine, how could you screw that up? It would be a perfect remake if done well. Thus eliminating the need for the original. This is 3D Realms point of view.
But the mod wasn't going to be sold. And as I said, can a group of part-time, unpaid developers actually beat anything a studio brings out? If that is the case, then should 3D Realms even be selling their product? The mod would have been a labour of love for the community - the same people who would have bought the next game anyway. If a mod threatens your professional project, then perhaps you have to question just how professional your project is.

This would be akin to WB telling fans to stop drawing fan art of Bugs Bunny and co. As for the Source engine - just because it's an impressive engine does not mean it would be easy to make a mod in it. Also, 3D Realms have more access to the source of their engine code than the mod developers have of Source's. This is an incomparable situation.
Binge & Purged: Foxed! ...by a gaming company? by James
PALGN Feature: What do you get when you make a fan mod for a popular franchise? Is that a) fame, b) fortune or c) threats from the creators? Funny, this should be a no-brainer...
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The problem with Nintendo is that it has all this credit with gamers because of all that it's done. But while this leverage might go down well for their legacy, it's not going to carry them in the current console wars - if it did the GAmecube would hav edone a lot better and the platform wouldn't have lost exclusives like Resident Evil 4.

Like I said, I like Nintendo, but their recent attitude and behaviour has been somewhat shocking and reminiscent of a small dog japping and snapping at everyone. Revelution is a make-or-break : after that console we'll see if Nintendo will stay in the hardware market (sans handhelds). Right now the company is outgunned by both Microsoft and Sony - the former might not be that far ahead of Nintendo in terms of hardware units, but it has more money and a lot more sense in what it takes ot conquer the modern market.

Regarding the games, these appeal to a lot of Nintendo fans, but they have also been fairly successful in not bringing in new blood to the Nintendo fan base. Once again I'm not referring to the handhelds here. Nitnendo has been sitting on its laurels for far too long in a market that is becoming more cutthroat by the day. Iwata-san's ridiculous 'paradigm shift' (which, let's face it, is akin to simply saying that it will be really cool - what hardware manufacturer won't say their upcoming product won't rock?) smells more of desperation than innovation. Even the DS, great as it is, is a glorified PDA. It doesn't do anything I haven't yet seen in the mobile market.
Binge & Purge: Nintendo are at it again by James
PALGN Feature: The Revolution will be a paradigm shift in gaming. This from a company that invented the industry’s hobby: flogging sequels and IPs at the hungry masses.
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I recall interviewing Miyamoto-san in 2003 about the Gamecube and the unique feature of the GBA connectivity, in which he said they plan to do a lot more with that. Come 2004 and there was very little exploiting the technology. 2005 and I'm straining to see a game that truly makes use of the feature (apart from extending your map to a small screen on your lap, which seems to be selling the potential of this short).

Another thing to consider is that 2D graphics were not dead - a lot of what's being done out there in the indie scene is pretty damn amazing. But the quick advent of 3D and the developers' urge to go onto that so as to take advantage of new hardware, almost killed the scene. If it wasn't for the GBA, I suspect sprites would have disappeared out of mainstream gaming a long time ago (and it's not just because 3D can be faster to do. If this held true then developers wouldn't spend so much time trying to implement new technology into games, because this does affect the production curve negatively)

I realise that new hardware come with definite perks and new gameplay functions, but I have to question if we're even seeing half of this potential, since we tend to push out new platforms well ahead of a console reaching its maturity. Essentially we are falling for the more powerful hardware and soon we might have a generation of gamers who know nothing else but "the next big thing".
Binge & Purge: Crammin' it into the kids by James
PALGN Feature: Arthur C Clarke said something about advanced enough technology can seem like magic. Visionary that he was, he was actually referring to how new technology makes perfectly usable technology disappear like magic.
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Binge & Purge: Et Tu Standards? by James
PALGN Feature: PSP! Widescreen! Pretty!

And if you buy now, we'll throw in an extra memory for free! No, just kidding. But you'll need that memory. Seriously. Now shut up and go play something.

Thank you for shopping with Sony!
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Tecmo and specifically Team Ninja never made a secret of it that they want to work on the most powerful hardware there is, hence the support for the Xbox. While it's still up in the air which will be more powerful in the next-gen battle, the Xbox Next is a sure bet for top contender.

It's also worth remembering that the Xbox Next is likely to get the first set of dedication from developers and publishers as it wants to be the first console to be released. Besides, Sony are too hard at work promoting the PSP to worry about the PS3 right now - when it comes they will develop for it. Let's just hope its not another convergence nightmare, but the company has learned its lessons with the PSX.

Ditto on the anti-Xbox retoric. I'm not a big Xbox fan, but comments like the one futher above smacks of the general ignorance gamers appear to have about what happens around them.
Binge & Purge: EA and the mighty dollar by James
PALGN Feature: It seems that everyone's job sucks, even if you're making games. Life's a bitch and then you die, huh? But a few disgruntled employees are just the shimmering of a much bigger iceberg in the way of HMS Gaming
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Re: Enter the Fanboy (9 years ago)
Thanks, Beepos!

Fanboys are old? I always thought they were younger. At least the most have to qualify as immature. But I also resent the idea tha fanboys keep the old games alive. I keep a lot of old games and old-school values alive, but I'm not a fan boy. Besides, how does that apply to all those WCG, CPL, Counter-strike and so on fan boys?

I think we should recognise the fine line seperating fan boys and enthusiasts.
Binge & Purge: Numbers – the real market pile-driver by James
PALGN Feature: Want a game? Follow the numbers – everyone else is. The greatest game of all time sits behind a mountain of pre-orders, sales and record-breaking press blurbs. And to think we once bought stuff by guessing about the back of the box.
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Re: Enter the Fanboy (9 years ago)
Nice article! I've always had some contention with fanboys, but as a fellow writer pointed out they also have a role to play in these things. They might look like an inherent evil, but they are at least passionate, despite their rampant ignorance. Then again, I've found that gamers in general are woefully ignorant, whether they are fanboys or not.

I suppose it's a matter of pride. I don't get either game: I thought Halo was a bit of a half-assed job when compared to the liked of Serious Sam and Killzone's over-reliance on often predictable scripted events proved to stunt its gameplay. But maybe the media is also to blame. Why did writers go out and call Killzone the Halo Killer, based purely on a few screenshots and that it was a PS2 exclusive FPS? I could really dislike the fanboys, but the writers are the ones who should know better and research a bit more, maybe exercise mroe discretion.

Bias is rampant in gaming and it's everywhere. Before we can even start to regard those at the lower ends of the ladder, perhaps we should look at those who incite these things in the first place with stupid and ill-advised comments. If IGN ever referred to Killzone as a Halo Killer prematurely, they deserve all the fanboy flame spam and then some. If they didn't then take it on the cheek. Any journo should know that fanboys don't know better. But I've long since suspected IGN's credibility...
Hmm, okay, quasi-censored. If I recall correctly, that was left in as a convenience to bypass the censorship situation. The proper version of the game required neither a password nor the later-released blood patch. So SCI found a loop-hole, but the point still stands.
It's a bit of irony, really. Being a south African I've seen a lot of countrymen immigrate to Australia because the climates are teh same, plus it's a Commonwealth thing. and for all intensive purposes it seems like the land of milk and honey, providing that you're planning to do the white picket fences thing. And this is becoming a bit too evident with the almost zealous refusal of age certificates for games (let's call it what it is: banning).

Let's see: GTA 3, Vice City, Manhunt, LSL to quote a few recent examples... Carmageddon was censored with green blood and unless I'm mistaken a few of the Mortal Kombat games also didn't make the cut thanks to, apparently, the Aussie authorities not permitting games that carry an R (18+) rating.

Now it might be Half-Life 2? It's a bit old, so I don't know if it's still relevant, but that must suck. How does it feel to be a gamer in a country where mature titles could easily be axed? I don't really know because we seem to let anything in these days - a nice lashback from the Apartheid era's ridiculous amount of censorship.
Binge and Purge: For those about to save, I salute you by James
PALGN Feature: Quicksave? It’s for the meek!
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I don't see what the fuss is about - Vice City holds the record at nearly four million...

http://www.gameforms.com/news/?455

Microsoft would like to dispute the figure, but even a speculated 4 million places the game well above the 3.5 million mark. I'm still confirming that figure with Rockstar, though.

http://www.gamespot.com/news/2004/10/06/news_6109802.html

Could we please aspire to slightly more research news reporting than just repeating what other sites are assuming?
Re: Juiced Preview (9 years ago)
We had some nice hands-on time with a review copy sent to our offices just before Acclaim went belly up. I can say that Juiced is well beyond what anyone thinks - unless you've actually played the game properly (ie, not those terrible demos).

Midnight Club and NFSU have more in common: Juiced is a far more hardcore ball-game and I could almost call it the Tony Hawk of street racers, but let's not get ahead of ourselves - yet. If there are any Street Legal fans here, you'll dig the game and even thos enot that fond of racing (like me) should get a kick out of it, especially if you like trick driving or just good ol' fashioned betting.

But none of these Need for Speed comparisons, please! Because there is none. Juiced is more attentive to detail, more immersive and demands a more dedicated and hardcore audience - or at least someone willing to spend a lot of time in front of their machines.
Anonymous wrote
Really? I saw a fair few more than "one or two". By December, we'll have...
Okay, so I was out - instead of two we'll have... five? One is a sequel, two are obviously catering for the youth market. And if we want to compare classroom scribbles here, you forgot to mention EyeToy: Antigrav.

I have my notes and my point stands. Besides, by December? How old is the EyeToy? If the peripheral is so damn important because it WOOs the mainstream market, then why are there only six titles TO BE RELEASED well over a year after the EyeToy was released? And such crappy options at that?

No, sorry, I don't need to do more research here. Confusing two games with six is hardly a difference, especially concerning a unit that has such a bad software release record (which I still count at two-and-a-bit).
Binge & Purge: Pounding the Mainstream by James
PALGN Feature: A game! Featuring plastic Kongas! Featuring a Monkey (ape)! Featuring frantic friends and family pounding the silly toy in your living room! Mainstream gaming nirvana! But we’ve been here before, so I’ll be at the bar.
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True. My lashback is really jsut about what's at stake here. For instance, what would have happened if Vavle decided all mods on the HL engine should carry a small fee? Not going to happen.

What would change my mind on the topic is if someone can demonstrate how this isn't a case of THQ milking money out of people when they don't need to.

Alas, I can't despise them completely They have Dawn of War Stalker, Detroy All Humans and now Juiced.
I don't think there are any legal grounds to fault THQ on - it's more the principle of it. Why charge for content that could have been free? I sincerely feel that if a company can afford to give away a few extra levels as a means to thanks you for buying their game, they should. But now they are just cashing in on the trend.

It makes sense on a business level, but I don't play games because I want to be involved in business. and I don't think we should take it every time the industry tries to milk us for money.

Btw, PC games normally cost around $50. An expanion costs between $20- $30 depending - and you get a lot out of it, including engine upgtrades, more MP maps, extra SP campaigns...
Binge & Purge: Money! Money! Money! by James
PALGN Feature: THQ wants your money and it's all good - unless you actually already paid for the game. Think publishers really care? I think some will sell your mother in packaging if they could...
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About time! I'm sorry, but after spending extensive time with both versions, I don't see what everyone's on about. There's nothing here that hasn't been done before and even Bungie admitted Halo's levels got repetitive (something I couldn't argue against Call of Duty, for instance). Someone speculated that maybe its because it introduced a new culture to the FPS genre - new blood to play the game, but it's probably not that simple.

Either way, I'm glad if they go for a new game, though quietly I'm hoping for an Oni sequel...
How about Guybrush Threepwood? He can hold his breath for ten minutes. Also, Solid Snake is a bit of a glaring ommission, isn't it? But the ultimate tough guys you missed were the Mecs from Giants: Citizen Kabuto...

Nice list, though.
Re: State Of Play #7 (9 years ago)
Well, how about some more detail on this? For instance, was any parenting group lobbying to have the game banned? On what criteria do these people work - do they play the game themselves or do they entertain comments from various groups? Plus, what does the local Take 2 distributor have to say about it?

I think there is a more important problem here - how can a game be awarded a certificate and then be banned? It's unusual and prompts me to think there's more invovled here than a simple revision of the content.
Well, I didn't want to dabble too much with specifics and illustrating how a lot more games actually partake in the ethos of licensing was just to reverse some of the demonising license games have suffered (even though most of that they brought upon themselves).

But you're right: Star Wars, D&D, Star Trek, Buffy - all of these are at least creating an interesting grey area between original games and license titles and perhaps we should look at them first. Star Wars, for instance, tends to offer some incredibly terrible games - but once a Studio like Raven or Bioware get to combine their development experience with a set franchise which already boasts a whole backdrop, the results get interesting. I don't quite count AD&D in that, because pen-and-paper role playing still constitute being games, so the leap between the two isn't that much (if anything, digital games limit the scope of traditional RPG).

Sure, few of these games are impressive. But they are getting better and better - at some point license games and their cousins will be at a natural advantage purely because they already have the grunt work taken care of. You make the perfect point in that these games should share the ideals of the source material. After all, it's the least fans should demand.
Binge & Purge: More Bang for your cash-cow bucks by James
PALGN Feature: License games will one day rule the world. No, not really, but they will win Game of the Year awards – one day.
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Binge & Purge: Europe Goes West by James
PALGN Feature: How a small-time British developer is attempting to bridge the cultural gap between East and West.
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