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Adam Ghiggino
20 Jan, 2009

Guitar Hero World Tour Review

PS3 Review | Squeedly-dee!
It was a long wait (almost a full year) for Aussies to finally get Harmonix's magnum opus, Rock Band. In fact, it was so long that America actually saw a full-blown sequel with improved instruments before the first instalment hit our shores. It was amongst this tide of discontent that Activision saw their chance to launch the good ship Guitar Hero World Tour in Australia alongsideRock Band's release As the true follow up to Guitar Hero III: Legends of Rock, World Tour offers a full band's worth of gameplay (including lead singer, lead guitar, bass and drummer), 86 songs drawn from official master tracks, a 'revolutionary' music creation mode and improved instruments. With online play and downloadble content to boot, is there anything stopping this megalith of musical might?

World Tour is developed by Neversoft, the guys behind all those Tony Hawk games over the years, and is their second attempt after Guitar Hero III, after Harmonix were acquired by MTV to start the Rock Band franchise. As such, it's even more impressive that they've attempted something on the scale of World Tour with comparatively less experience. One look at the track list will tell you that it has some serious muscle, with Jimi Hendrix, Metallica and even Tool. There's also some popular favourites such as Michael Jackson and Coldplay rounding out the list, making for a game that's likely to have something for everyone.

And now to hyptonise you with my awesome guitar!

And now to hyptonise you with my awesome guitar!
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As with all Guitar Hero games, the main draw of the title is the Career mode, which can be played either by yourself or co-operatively with others as a band. It plays slightly differently to previous entries in the series, as instead of playing one song at a time, unlocking new venues as you go, you're presented with a billboard which gradually fills up with setlists, which contain several songs. Upon choosing a setlist, you'll be required to play all of the songs on that list in order, without a break (excluding of course the surprisingly helpful pause function, which actually counts you down back into the song once you resume). You'll often unlock more than one setlist, so you're given some freedom in which songs you tackle first, but it's not exactly the most non-linear game ever made. It's a far cry from the ironically titled 'World Tour' mode in Rock Band, which is far more complicated and even has some RPG elements (such as gaining fans and stars). Career mode is perfectly adequate for parties and short performances, but offers little meat for gamers looking for a serious challenge.

Career mode is also spiced up a little with celebrity appearances from rock legends such as Ozzy Osbourne, Sting and a freshly re-arisen Jimi Hendrix. You'll sometimes be required to go head-to-head with these gods of rock, and if you succeed they just might join your performance for some real hardcore rockin'. However, if you're more interested in creating your own star, then you'll find ample room to experiment in the character editor. There's a vast array of customization options for your rocker, from body shape to clothes, tattoos and the component parts of the instruments you play. You can even choose opening and victory animations for your character, in a feature that seems to take notes from the extensive animation options in the WWE Smackdown vs. Raw series. Besides career mode, Guitar Hero World Tour also offers an easy to use Quick Play mode, as well as several head-to-head competitive modes.

A noticeable (fortunate?) lack of bust size option.

A noticeable (fortunate?) lack of bust size option.
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Of course, the main addition to the Guitar Hero franchise is the ability to sing with a compatible microphone or smash out a rythmn with a compatible drum kit. The official drums are a sight to behold, offering a snare, two toms and two cymbals, as well as a kickpedal and a very cool design. Due to their velocity sensing feature, the drums can detect how hard you hit them, and some notes in-game actually require you to hit harder to score points. Unfortunately, there are some sensitivity issues with this kit, although Activision have responded by releasing a downloadable tuning kit utility to manually set these levels. The official guitar now has a touch-sensative panel, which is used both for 'tap strumming' regular notes and for touch-sliding along particular sections of a song, where the appropriate notes are connected by a blue line. It's a nice addition, although it can take a while to get used to. It should also be noted that the note-detection in World Tour feels a little more lax when compared to Rock Band, which may be good or bad depending on your viewpoint, but definitely makes for a different feeling game. Finally, the microphone works much as you'd expect it to, with no noticeable issues to speak of.

The last major feature of Guitar Hero World Tour is its music creation mode, which allows players to create their own music featuring lead guitar, bass and drums. Don't expect too much though, as the songs resemble MIDI tunes more than they resemble actual pieces of rock music. Using the Recording Studio, several people at a time can contribute notes on their respective instruments, which seems simple, but can be hard to get the timing completely right. For more precise control over your creation, you can head over to the GHMix mode, which is on the opposite end of the scale in terms of ease-of-use. It's hideously complicated, and will probably scare off anyone but the most determined would-be rock artists. That's not to say you can't get the hang of it eventually, it just takes a while to know your way around the interface without constantly having to refer to the help guide. On the other hand, it's quite easy to find other people's created content using the GHTunes option in the menu, as you can browse the most popular songs or just search for something in particular. Although, to be honest, most of the entries on there currently consist of Nintendo themes and Final Fantasy battle remixes.

That eye is such a tool. Get it? You see, the eye and the Tool band...

That eye is such a tool. Get it? You see, the eye and the Tool band...
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The presentation of the game is a little hit and miss. While the scope of the game is epic, with impossibly huge stages and props which would never pass safety regulations, sometimes the graphics just don't seem to match up to the vision, with some blurry textures and some glitching that we encountered throughout later levels. However, the game does hold up at a very fluid frame-rate, and there are some nice touches throughout like the Gorilliaz-style animated sequences which bookend the Career modes. It also goes without saying that the sound quality is excellent for all of the included tracks.

Guitar Hero World Tour is an ambitious step from Neversoft as they try to keep up with Harmonix's Rock Band franchise. While Aussies still have to wait to see what Harmonix's sequel will bring, World Tour offers an unbelievable soundtrack in the meantime. Even if the more hardcore Dream Theater or Tool aren't your thing, there's still plenty to do in the game's several modes. It's a shame that the Music Creation mode is just too convoluted and produces subpar-sounding music, because otherwise it could have been a revolutionary feature. Little niggling issues throughout the game also drag it down, but when the game works, it works extremely well. There's still nothing that can beat you and three mates hitting star power just at the right moment to collect an insane amount of points, and if you're willing to risk some technical issues with its instruments, Guitar Hero World Tour offers a lot of rock and roll for your buck.
The Score
Guitar Hero World Tour indeed rocks the house. It isn't as revolutionary as we may have hoped for, but it still packs in a whole heap of fun. 8
Looking to buy this game right now? PALGN recommends www.Play-Asia.com.

Related Guitar Hero World Tour Content

Guitar Hero World Tour's July DLC revealed
11 Jul, 2009 You can be my sugar, be my cherry cola.
Guitar Hero in a state of Nirvana
13 Dec, 2008 Nirvana DLC hits World Tour today.
Guitar Hero World Tour PS3 drums incompatible with Rock Band?
28 Oct, 2008 Universal instrument compatability not quite so universal?
23 Comments
5 years ago
Quote
With online play and downloadble content to boot, is there anything stopping this megalith of musical might?
Yep - themselves and the quality of their plastic instruments. I know you mentioned the sensitivity issues but the guitars also seem to be breaking more frequently than previous controllers (anecdotally plus personal experience), and the drums are also breaking, not just having sensitivity problems.

And just between you and me, I *still* don't have the free USB-to-MIDI cable that's required to do the actual tuning despite repeated emails and follow ups, so how the heck do I know if the sensitivity problems I'm experiencing on my drumkit will be fully rectified?

A music/rhythm game is all about being able to play it "naturally", not be stressed about whether your strum bar will all of a sudden stop working in one direction, or worried that you have to remember to hit the yellow cymbal 25% harder than the red drum pad, and you can't afford *any* glitches in visuals or they go out of whack with the music you're supposed to be playing along to.
5 years ago
I completely agree, World Tour is an ambitious effort, but the more they open up gameplay with features like drums, touch strumming, etc.. the less reliable the gear becomes.

While I love the new guitar that comes with World Tour for it's firmer weight, larger size and above all; a longer whammy bar - my touch pad is oversensitive and will make a random strum when my fingers are no where near it. You can imagine my frustration when trying to 5 Star a track or competing online. Thankfully there's the option to turn it off. I also see the sections of World Tour that allow you to touch strum as a total gimmick.

I've tuned my drums which noticably improves the hit detection, but may not work for everyone. My friend as a World Tour drum kit for his 360 that one day suddenly stopped detecting hits on the red pad unless it was struck dead centre. We tried to tune it without result. Im sure my drums will go at some stage, but I dont care as I rarely use them. Personally, I find drumming less satisfying because I can't actually hear the simulated drumming sound over the real thumping I make as opposed to hearing guitar notes from strumming and holding fret keys.. the experience is sort of lost on me when all you hear is rubber being thumped in time to a track. If the drum pads could be made even quieter, I would actually be interested in drumming.

For a game that revolves around precise timing, I agree that the hardware is really holding things back ultimate enjoyment.

Apart from that, World Tour features the most amount of songs in any Guitar Hero title to date, but quantity does not necessarily mean quality. Unlike Guitar Hero 2 which in my opinion; has the best tracklist so far, World Tour really falls short.

There are tons of songs that; whilst I was playing, would be secretly wishing they'd end because I felt they weren't fun to play (Ramblin' Man FFS? Talk about snoozeville!). Whilst I see that Activision is trying to now appeal to as many different audiences as they can, for the amount of tracks on the game, I would have to say that 80% of them aren't ones that I'll ever want to play again because they feel like a boring chore.

Like a whore who cheats on her husband because he is woeful in bed, I've imported Rock Band 2 for the Wii and I must say that in comparison, it does a lot more right than World Tour. For example, there are many more incentives in place to compel you to tour and perform well in songs. In addition to just earning cash in World Tour, Rock Band 2 has a fan, a star and a management system.

What does this mean? Depending on how well you play and what sort of event you're in, you may earn more fans than cash at a gig depending on who you hire. Earning more fans will get your reputation up and may earn the interest of record studio big wigs or promoters that you can hire to earn more money or unlock new touring locations respectively. Earning cash will of course allow you to buy clothes, accessories and instruments.

The managing section is a great feature which lets you hire certain people that will either earn you more fans per gig, extra cash or unlock new locations to play at. Interested in earning more green? Hire the shameless manager and sell out. Want some extra fans per gig? Hire a street team to spread word of your band and win hearts.

Ontop of this, before you start a track, at random you may get you the option to play 'double or nothing'. 4 stars or more will earn you double the fans, cash or both.. and anything less will result in zilch. It certainly makes things fun. Sometimes you may get an offer to play at a charity gig which will earn you tons more fans - you can be a royal asshole and decline though.. so how you play is entirely up to you. These sorts of random ocurrences really mix it up and are a breath of fresh air.

The interface is alot cleaner in Rock Band 2. The fretboard (where the music scrolls across) is simply black and is tidier and less cluttered. Instead of round notes, Rock Band 2 has flat bars, which makes hammer on and pull off notes easier to identify because they appear shorter. Once Overdrive is activated (Rock Band's equivalent to Star Power), the notes do NOT light up. Instead, the fretboard is enamoured with a gilded golden design. A great idea, seeing as energised notes in Guitar Hero sometimes prove to throw me off.

The score multiplier is a simple round disc that fills up below the fret board which is accompanied by a number multiplier and the crowd meter is simply a long thin tube to the left of the screen (think of a thermometer). One thing lacking in Rock Band 2 is a track breakdown showing how well you did after you've finished a song, but this is instead replaced with a feature that I feel provies a greater benefit - on the top right of the screen under your score, you are show how many stars (out of 5) you have attained whilst playing a song. A great feature which I prefer over the song analysis.

During some songs that have guitar solos, the fret board will have a light blue glow. Nail the entire solo and you get extra points - ideal for the competitive player as some solos are insanely tricky. The same happens for a bass solo (called 'Bass Groove'). Im yet to drum or sing, so I can't comment on their features.

Rock Band 2 is funny in the way that each gig will have different band members randomly generated to play alongside you if you are going it alone. This gets weird when you're playing a 3 track setlist and have a male character as lead singer. The band lineup wont change during the whole set. So if one of the songs has a female lead singer in the vocal track, bizarrity ensues. It's quite amusing to see a burly looking guy singing a whiny Paramore track or vice versa.

Speaking of tracks, it's clear to see that Harmonix, like Neversoft - appear to have had less creative control over every track in their list (either that, or they have softer tastes these days). There's the usual pop crap would wouldn't have imagined seeing in Guitar Hero or Guitar Hero II, aswell as songs you'd never imagine to be in a Harmonix inspired Rock Band lineup ('Conventional Lover' anyone?), but so far there's a solid offering of tracks which are a little more memorable and warrant further replays than those of World Tour which had less to go back to in my opinion. Some of the tracks in both World Tour and Rock Band 2 are just boring, repetitive strummers - that's why my friend and I always return to Guitar Hero II for tune shredding goodness - the tracklist there just can't be beat. I do believe Harmonix should stop reaching out to the mainstream just to win sales and go back to the days of old, but that's just me.

Personally, one major setback I have in Rock Band 2 though when it comes to songs is that I find yourself replaying a ton of them!

Some cities will have setlists in addition to single track gigs. Usually you'll select a city and see that you'll have 2 or 3 single tracks to play that are followed by two setlists. These are kind of like 'track marathons' featuring 2,3,4 + songs you'll play in one sitting. This usually includes a song you've already played atleast twice already which can be a drag because you'll need to finish the setlist to earn more stars, allowing you to advance and unlock new gigs.

I suppose the setlist feature will become broader and fresher, the more songs you unlock as you progress in Tour mode. The best thing is that downloadable content will feature in these setlists, making Rock Band 2 a rounded out experience for people who have a ton of tracks downloaded to their systems - a big plus as I've had a look at the music store and am drooling over some of the tracks there. Being an early bird, I'm unable to download them due to regional compatibility.. more on that later.

Ontop of that, Rock Band 2 outdoes World Tour in it's extra features. 'Drum Trainer' is a feature that actually teaches the player real drum fills, which is quite handy. Challenge mode is a feature that helps unlock new tracks aswell as increase your skills. Tracks will get harder and harder the further you go. This can be played either with a band or on your own.

In addition to online solo or band face offs, Rock Band 2 also has numerous online challenges for band or solo players that are posted weekly. Consider these as ghost data challenges. You will play a pre-determined setlist and your overall score gets posted online and you earn a rank (and cash for your band!). It's a great feeling to see your efforts rewarded by being placed 15th out of 3000 entrants and you are welcome to jump back in to give it as many tries as you like until the contest expires. Challenges will vary with some asking for your top score, or others giving you a total of stars per performance. You earn more stars by flawless playing in conjunction whammies and strategic use of Overdrive.

On the downloadable content side of things, as I own the US version of Rock Band 2 and have a PAL Wii console, I am excluded from the downloadable content due to Wii Shop Channel regional differences. If this weren't the case, I would give Rock Band 2 a 9.5 and World Tour an 8.

As of now, Id say they're neck and neck if you pardon the pun icon_smile.gif
5 years ago
I imported Rock Band from the States about June last year. All my original instruments have had no problems and still work perfectly. I imported the Rock Band 2 disc when it was released in America and bought the $5 DLC which let me burn all my rock band 1 songs to my hardrive. I also made a dummy US account to get DLC. I have over 200 tracks going now, and i must say Rock Band 2 is by far the best music experience you could ever ask for. I have also played Guitar Hero: World Tour, and there are just so many minor things that Rock Band does better, i would recommend even rock band 1 over World Tour.

My biggest thing is failing. Rock Band and World Tour are meant to be party games, you bring them out for everyone to play when you have friends over drinking and what not. Now Rock Band uses a saviour system, where is you fail, your other band members can use 'overdrive' to bring you back in 3 times per song. Rock Band 2 goes as far as to enable a NO FAIL option, which i love. When my mates come over and bring there girlfriends and stuff, or people that have never played any music game, they can play without the fear of the better players ridiculing them if they fail on easy. Whereas World Tours, if one fails you all immediately fail is in my opinion a huge turn off for people who aren't very good at playing.

My mate has World Tour and his drums required a USB Cable to fix sensitivity issues, then about a week after he got that and fixed those problems, his red pad stopped working all together which required a whole new drum set all together. And i know, i know, World Tour has pads and cymbals so it's more like playing a real kit. I would prefer a 4 pad working kit than a 5 pad broken kit anyday. And the foot pedal of Rock Band slots into the kit so it stays put, whereas when i played at my friends house on world tour, the pedal seems to wanna get away from me as it would not grip to his wooden floorboards.

He has never used the create song feature of world tour, as i guess 90% of the people that have world tour don't, so that exclusive feature is pretty pointless.

My advice to anyone, if you have not purchased one and are thinking of it, import Rock Band 2 from UK (360, PS3) hire rock band 1 from the video store or borrow from someone, put all those songs on your hardrive and have the best experience.

or:

Buy Rock Band locally and import Rock Band 2 Disc from UK. (Rock Band 1 instruments are still solid)

or(If you already have World Tour):

Import Rock Band 2 Disc from UK (Instruments will work on PS3 and 360) and throw your world tour disc away after realizing how superior Rock Band 2 is gameplay wise and setlist wise.
5 years ago
Quote
Rock Band 2 is funny in the way that each gig will have different band members randomly generated to play alongside you if you are going it alone.
or you could make a bunch of other people and insert them into your band as fill ins from the band profile screen, i only have people i made playing in my band.....which has devin townsend on guitar icon_smile.gif Rock band 1 doesn't have this option though...
5 years ago
Jaws wrote
...
Rock Band 2 is funny in the way that each gig will have different band members randomly generated to play alongside you if you are going it alone. This gets weird when you're playing a 3 track setlist and have a male character as lead singer. The band lineup wont change during the whole set. So if one of the songs has a female lead singer in the vocal track, bizarrity ensues. It's quite amusing to see a burly looking guy singing a whiny Paramore track or vice versa.

...
On the downloadable content side of things, as I own the US version of Rock Band 2 and have a PAL Wii console, I am excluded from the downloadable content due to Wii Shop Channel regional differences. If this weren't the case, I would give Rock Band 2 a 9.5 and World Tour an 8.

As of now, Id say they're neck and neck if you pardon the pun icon_smile.gif
So you'd reduce RB2 from a 9.5 down to an 8 because - on the Wii - you're excluded from DLC?

About the band members - you can create multiple characters and set them to be the default character for particular band mates. So it doesn't have to be random, and you can swap them in and out if you really feel the need. For me, I use my daughter's character as my default singer when I'm playing on drums.
5 years ago
MrAndyPuppy wrote
So you'd reduce RB2 from a 9.5 down to an 8 because - on the Wii - you're excluded from DLC?
Absolutely. This is only because I own what is effectively a crippled version of the game because it is from the US and I can't access their server to download tracks. That's why if Rock Band 2 is ever released on PAL shores for the Wii, I will personally rate it much higher than Guitar Hero World Tour for the Wii, because of the reasons I mentioned in my earlier post..

As I said earlier, I am having to repeat songs because I am early on in the tour and have absolutely no DL content which would make up the sets, hence my quasi-rating.

To everyone else: As was mentioned above, if you own a 360 or Playstation 3, do yourself a favour and import the European version of Rock Band 2, grab the original Rock Band, purchase the transfer license for a few bucks and have yourself one hell of a time!

The fact that I can't access downloadable content due to having a PAL Wii is disappointing, but that's the risk you take when importing games. I'm still happy that I can play the 70 or so regular tracks.

As for the band member thing.. it doesn't phase me in the least, I just thought i'd mention it because it looks totally camp and quite funny.
5 years ago
Jaws wrote
To everyone else: As was mentioned above, if you own a 360 or Playstation 3, do yourself a favour and import the European version of Rock Band 2, rent the original Rock Band, purchase the transfer license for a few bucks and have yourself one hell of a time!
I really can't support this kind of action. As I have worked in the software industry for close to 20 years I'm very conscious of piracy, and what you're proposing here is, at its core, little different. The transfer license allows you to use RB1 songs within RB2, but its license requires you to own RB1.

[gah! 999 posts! I'm not ready for the 1000 yet!]
5 years ago
^ i have wondered what people's thoughts on the license transfer is, especially in the case of renting the game, or even EB Renting.

it's definitely side-stepping something as far as i'm concerned, but surely when they added that functionality, they realised it was a concern? i guess if the license does explicitly say "you must own RB1" then there's no two ways about it.
5 years ago
Im not into piracy either and as such, I've altered my post. Payment is due where payment is earned. I do understand that you need to pay for the transfer license though, which I am guessing wouldn't be inplace otherwise. As Obs has said, I'm sure Harmonix has contemplated the ramifications associated with transferring tracks from Rock Band and this fee is in place to cover that aspect because I dare they foresaw that not everyone is honest in that regard.
5 years ago
As far as I'm concerned piracy of RB2/RB1 is their own fault. I mean the wait for RB1 in Australia had me importing it, creating an online American credit card and creating a second profile for my PS3 that was US based. I believe most of this is somewhat illegal but I just can't see why we should have to wait an extra year for something that is able to work.

The Rockband 2 VS GHWT Debate = RB2 Wins
Rockband VS GHWT Debate = RB Wins

RB1/2 are just more accessable games. The mechanics in both are similar but RB just makes it easy to get your party on. icon_smile.gif
5 years ago
ObsoletE wrote
^ i have wondered what people's thoughts on the license transfer is, especially in the case of renting the game, or even EB Renting.

it's definitely side-stepping something as far as i'm concerned, but surely when they added that functionality, they realised it was a concern? i guess if the license does explicitly say "you must own RB1" then there's no two ways about it.
I think it says something along the lines of "By using this song export feature you are stating that you own and will continue to retain the original Rock Band game"
5 years ago
It might be justifiable by the fact that had Rock Band been released in Australia in a reasonable timeframe with the rest of the world, people would have bought the original game rather than be inclined to skip to the sequel. Rock Band 2 was out overseas before Rock Band was out here.

Had Rock Band been released properly, it would be more likely that Australians buying Rock Band 2 would legitimately own Rock Band already.

I'm not specifically condoning it but its hard to feel bad when we were so thoroughly screwed over. I mean, we're still being screwed over by the fact that RB2 isn't out here.
5 years ago
I found World Tour to be very disapointing, especially compared to Rock Band. Sure Rock Band took forever to get here, but it was so worth the wait in my mind.

Guitar Hero is still stuck on the same thing; adding cool features which don't really work (i.e Boss Battles) and ignoring the simple stuff.

I wouldn't rate Guitar Hero this high at all, I might give it a 4 or 5 but not an 8. I got the full band kit and was impressed with the instrumets...at first. However lately they have been having too many problems so I'm somewhat less than impressed now.

For me (and many of my friends) Rock Band is far superior. It does more of the little things which make the game fun. It's not easy by any means but it's only really about playing songs with your friends. They haven't filled it with pointless little extras like Guitar Hero has and it makes it so much more fun to play.
5 years ago
Quote
Rock Band 2 is funny in the way that each gig will have different band members randomly generated to play alongside you if you are going it alone.
What i find even more funny is when you do multiple song play-lists and the 1st song has a male singer while the next song has a female singer....it's highly amusing watching a male character is singing something like You Oughta Know by Alanis Morissette....even more amusing when a female character is singing something like Visions by Abnormality...XD

SumAznGuy
5 years ago
Love this game (and RB2, too). My only gripe is that in multiplayer the note-highways get cropped (and not scaled like in RB2) which can make it much harder to play with a decent amount of hyperspeed.

Jaws wrote
I also see the sections of World Tour that allow you to touch strum as a total gimmick.
The solo-guitar sections in Rock Band are almost the same thing, but in World Tour the mechanic has been designed in such a way that it does not discriminate against what guitar controller you use. That's a good thing for me as I much prefer to tap using the fret buttons over the touchpad anyway. Pity that Rockband doesn't cater to non-RB guitars in the same way D=
5 years ago
Quote
even more amusing when a female character is singing something like Visions by Abnormality
*cough* Arch Enemy.........and you are going to have to laugh, the singer of abnormality is a female, haaaaaa

5 years ago
and then his legs fell off
5 years ago
you mean mirror mirror on the wall make my dick touch the floor?
5 years ago
Holy shit. Really??hahahahaha...Now that is weird. -_-"

SumAznGuy
5 years ago
I was really hoping for some true GUI Critique here:

PALGN wrote
The presentation of the game is a little hit and miss.
Neglecting to mention how horrible the Star Power placement on screen is, let alone almost anything telling you about how well you are performing is a pretty big oversight.

There's nothing more of a Party-Breaker than to literally fail out of a song out of nowhere because you had literally no clue how well you were going until it was too late. This is one of the great reasons as to why I expect some sort of Rock Band "Saviour" Mechanic in this year's Guitar Hero edition...
5 years ago
I have started playing this fairly recently, and, well, compared to GH3 (never having played 1 or 2), GHWT was terrible.

The HUD is all over the place for one thing. Saving your score is annoying, having to press blue to see the the list of high scores sucks. The display information in Quickplay is worse than 3. The fact that you don't get to play through career mode in each difficulty using a single band aggravates me. But these are all minor.

What makes this game terrible? The horrendous note highway for Eye of the Tiger on Expert. Why am I playing bass for most of the song? Why, during the awesome chorus, (Dun dun DUN) do I have to play bass between the notes? When I play this song, the chorus is what I want to be able to play properly. Having to play bass between notes is just ridiculous, and destroys the best part of thw whole song. I know it makes it harder, but I'd rather have it be authentic.

EDIT: Also, the drumming and singing just aren't much fun.
Worst note highway ever.
5 years ago
I feel despite the instruments for GHWT to be superior to that of Rock Band, everything else Rock Band seems to shine well past.

Its also a known fact that Rock Band 2's instruments are upgraded, most notably the strummer in the guitar and they are all wireless.

Guitar Hero doesnt stray far from its formula, it feels the extra instruments in the game itself feel like an afterthought, still prioritising crazy riff's in favor of playing together. And the track list does not fit my music tastes.

It seems that Harmonix is still the king of its genre however in Australia brand naming goes a long way and Rock Band didnt get a year to establish itself as the Harmonix's successor their former franchise.

I was hoping to have my hands on Rock Band 2 by now but that has not been the case, I guess I can import the thing myself.
5 years ago
yeah do it, you won't be disappointed, especially when you export the rock band 1 songs, think i have around 200 songs available on RB2 these days.
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  Pre-order or buy:
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Australian Release Date:
  12/11/2008 (Deleted)
Publisher:
  Activision
Genre:
  Music
Year Made:
  2008

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