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Chris Sell
29 Nov, 2005

Resident Evil 4 Review

PS2 Review | Capcom's masterpiece finally arrives on the PS2.
The hype surrounding Resident Evil 4 on the GameCube was typically low key for a Nintendo machine, despite the popularity of Capcom's long running series. Much of this was down to the fact that there were so many questions people needed answering. Could it possibly be the best Resident Evil? How can it be changed so drastically and still feel like RE? For those who showed no interest in the previous games, what on earth could Capcom do to evoke their interest? And what about existing fans of the series? No umbrella? No zombies?! Well, all fears were put to rest as the game achieved top praise from us back in March, and now Capcom have seen fit to release this masterpiece onto the PlayStation 2. Given that the game was such a technical powerhouse, many could be forgiven for being skeptical about how well it would transfer to the PS2 hardware, but in all honesty there’s very little to worry about.

The story starts off relatively basic. You play the role of Leon Kennedy from Resident Evil 2. In the six years that have passed since Leon escaped the Raccoon City incident and a lot has happened. Umbrella Corporation has folded due to the incident and pressure from the US Government while Leon has since become a member of a special unit assigned to protect the President’s daughter. However, before Leon can start his job, someone kidnaps the President’s daughter, Ashley. Under the direct order of the President, Leon must travel to Europe to a strange village where she had reportedly been seen at, find her, and bring her back safely. Leon arrives in this village and is soon attacked by the local villagers who, while they're not the mutated zombies of Resident Evil fame, are not quite human. As is tradition with Capcom's survival horror series, there are plenty of journals and memo's to read filling in background info, but the main story progresses in a much more cinematic style than before, giving Resident Evil 4 a much epic feel right from the start, something that survival horror games haven't quite achieved in the past.

To put it simply, Resident Evil 4 reinvents the survival horror genre. On just gameplay alone, there is no other survival-horror game today that is deeper, more intense, more polished, or generally more fun to play. In fact, there are few games of any type that can match what Resident Evil 4 is. So what makes RE4 so special? Well, firstly are the improvements made with the controls. While the game uses the same control scheme used by its predecessors as a base, it works far better than before. The reason it for this is due to the change in how the camera works. Instead of having fixed camera angles, which was the cause of many directional problems when moving from screen to screen, the camera is now fixed behind the shoulder of Leon. Now pressing forward on the analog stick will always make you move forward while holding left and right will turn. Holding square will allow for running while a simultaneous press of down + square results in a 180 degree turn which you'll soon learn to fall back on frequently in times of crisis. However, the biggest change to the controls is that of the new manual aiming system. By holding R1 Leon will draw his weapon and you can then aim it with the control stick much like how the N64 Goldeneye worked, and just as precise. Also, a knife can now be equipped by simply holding L1, which is a great addition as it's on hand instantly rather than swapping it in the menus like the past games.

Although the game is now presented as a 3rd-person shooter you do not have the ability to strafe. Initially it will feel strange but it soon becomes forgotten. The game simply doesn't need it anyway as the slight restriction of the controls adds to tension but without becoming frustrating. You can peek around corners however by moving the right analog stick that helps reduce the need for strafing anyway. In comparison to the GameCube original, the control probably suffers the greatest of all the different aspects of the game. Firstly, the analog stick just isn’t as tight or precise so careful aiming with sniper rifles does suffer somewhat as a result. It is much better than expected, but it does make for a few frustrating moments when you’re low on ammo and you can’t quite aim to the degree of precision that you want and waste bullets needlessly. The second problem is down to the analog buttons that the PS2 controller has. Everything requires a hard press which again can be annoying when your light taps don’t register and you fail to pick up an item or shoot your gun as a result. After trying a few different pads just incase I had a dodgy X button, it just seems that you need to press the button 3/4 of the way in all of the time. This does make hard work of the controls, reminding you that you’re playing a game, thus breaking the immersion and tarnishing the gameplay mildly.

Much of the core gameplay with which Resident Evil is known for is still evident in RE4. The game still remains a continuous journey of combat, survival and puzzle solving at heart, but is now a more linear adventure with a stronger emphasis on action and less on backtracking with items needed to progress further. The puzzles are fewer than before and while there are still a fair few mental-based problems to solve, puzzles tend to have you interacting with your surrounding environment to progress rather than simply finding a certain key that unlocks a certain door. The usual items can be found laying around the world of RE4 like healing herbs and weapon ammo along with treasure. Treasures are a great way to earn yourself money. Combining smaller treasures with the right larger one means you can sell them for higher values to a new feature in the Resident Evil series, the Merchant. The Merchant will buy practically anything from you for a price. Money can be spent on a variety of things, most importantly, buying and upgrading weapons. You can buy anything from handguns, shotguns, rifles and even a Rocket Launcher. Not only this, but you can use your money to upgrade current weapons to increase their capacity, firepower, reloading speed, etc. Upgrade them fully and you'll unlock a special 'exclusive' feature for that weapon.

Hey, good lookin'!

Hey, good lookin'!
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Another huge improvement over past Resident Evil games is the inventory management system. Key items are now on a separate screen with unlimited space making things much simpler, inventory space is now much more plentiful, and the storage crates and ink ribbons of the previous titles are thankfully gone. Switching weapons is only a two or three button presses away, and while it might have been nice if Capcom could have included some way to switch weapons on the fly with the d-pad or something, more often than not you find yourself needing to pause it to give you some planning time to decide which weapon would be best for the situation. Also implemented is the ability to save as many times as you want without the need for an ink ribbon. Many people didn’t like that aspect of the past RE games so this is a much welcome change in my eyes. With just a few small improvements, Capcom have eliminated needless complication from its menus and made the game more user friendly from the start.

But Resident Evil 4's biggest improvement is to the combat. Gone are the slow moving zombies and cramped corridors of the previous games and in its place are wide-open areas with the kind of size and complexity most games can only dream of. Despite the fact the game is more open and the controls are far less restrictive, RE4 manages to attain a high level of tension and suspense never seen before. Instead of fighting dumb enemies that just slowly shuffle towards you, you now have to deal with packs of strong, fast and most importantly, intelligent enemies. The enemy AI is simply fantastic. On spotting you they will communicate with each other to coordinate their attack. Then they'll move towards you, not slowly and singularly, but in groups at pace and if you don't move quickly, it's game over. But it's when you move that you see them at their best. Go into a house and they'll follow you in. No longer does a mere door stop them coming in, they'll smash right through it. It's not just doors either, they'll quite happily prop up a ladder next to a window and climb in that way. You can delay their attacks by moving furniture across windows and doorways, but that's all it does, delay them. Before long that wardrobe you just blocked the door with is reduced to nothing more than a pile of broken wood on the floor. Constantly throughout the game you will find yourself scrambling for a good place to fight enemies from and trying to figure out the best way to approach a battle, RE4's combat is nothing short of pure brilliance.

This of course is just as much to do with the weapons you possess and the actual control you have over them. Each of RE4's weapons has their own benefits and weaknesses. Shotguns are of course ideal for close range combat, pistols offer accuracy at all kinds of distances while Rifles are superb for one hit headshots at distance, especially with a sniper scope equipped. Actual control of the weapons is flawless. Once you take aim with the R1 button you are given complete control, meaning you can aim anywhere and take shots at any part of an enemy’s body. Headshots will obviously kill the quickest, but doing things like shooting enemies legs or shooting weapons from their hands are of just as much importance at times. In fact, by shooting legs you can stun enemies and set them up for one of Leon's close combat moves. When an enemy is stunned you can kick an enemy down or even throw them onto their head with a simple tap of the X button, which, along with the use of the knife, is great way of preserving ammo in one-on-one encounters. Leon also has 3 types of grenades he can use, frag, incendiary and flash, each of which has their own unique uses. Another small change to the combat is how reloading weapons now has to be done in game and not via the menus. Because of the new weapon upgrading system, it’s clear why the option to manually reload via the menu was taken out because there would be no point in spending your money on improving your reload time if you could simply just press start and select reload.

Escorting is another first for Resident Evil and was something I was personally skeptical about considering how few games have managed to pull it off, even the superb Ico had the odd frustrating moment when Yorda wouldn't follow you. RE4 again pulls this off magnificently. Once you find Ashley she will take cover behind you, duck if you take aim, or be able to find her way to you if she falls behind. You can leave her anywhere by pressing R2, or even hide her away in any nearby dumpsters. When you call her again with the same button she'll be behind you within seconds. Never does she block your way or stand in the way of your fire. While I'd estimate you only have to escort her for less than 10% of the game, RE4 makes the sections where you are guarding her actually enjoyable rather than the hassle they could quite have easily have been.

Resident Evil 4 also boasts some Shenmue-like 'QTE' (Quick Timer Event) cut scenes. Rather than just sitting there watching cut scene events unfold on screen, Capcom have added interactivity to a lot of them. For a simple example, there is a cut scene, which sees Leon having to make a large jump across a large gap. Instead of just watching Leon jump the gap and attempt to pull himself up without falling, you're asked to press A as fast as you can to 'pull' Leon up yourself. Succeed and you'll continue seamlessly into the game, fail and you fall to your death. Without spoiling things, these interactive cut scenes are extended further later on into actual combat. This greatly expands interest in the cut scenes and keeps you focused on the gameplay even as the story is unfolding. While it wouldn't really work in something like Metal Gear Solid where you’d be sitting through lengthy cinematics, it works brilliantly here. Unfortunately, due to the PS2 version running prerecorded videos instead of real time cut scenes, there are brief pauses between button presses where the game is loading which slightly spoils the rhythm of things. But it is only a split second so it’s not game ruining by any means, and for people who haven’t already played the GC version it’s not even an issue.

Just don't make them angry, ok?

Just don't make them angry, ok?
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All this praise and I've yet to even mention the biggest, most impressive and eternally memorable part of Resident Evil 4, the Bosses. From start to finish their designs consistently amaze. And I don't mean just in a visual sense, it's the actual combat you have with them that really makes them so unforgettable. Most of them are huge leaving you little space to run and hide, combined with their brutal attacks, some of which can kill in a single blow, mean you're constantly having to perform well timed dodging actions with the face and shoulder buttons, offering a great deal of reward when you pull them off successfully. Defeating them is not just a simple case of shooting them until they die either. Many have multiple changing weak points, combine the use of surrounding equipment/environments and even use some 'QTE' cut scenes. Many games have their classic boss fights, but there are few that can match what Resident Evil 4 has in either quality or quantity.

Resident Evil 4's has as much lifespan as you could wish for in a single player game of this type. The main game genuinely takes around 20hours on the first play through, around the same length as similar adventure-themed games such as Metal Gear Solid 3 and Metroid Prime which personally is an ideal length for a game of this type. On completion you'll get a rundown on how many saves you have done, how long it took you to complete the game, shot accuracy, etc. The default difficulty is remarkably well judged. Rarely is the game easy, but rarely is it too hard either. I think I clocked in over 50 deaths on my final stats page but dying isn't a frustration thanks to the superb invisible checkpoint system that somehow manages to put you back far enough that dying feels like a penalty, but not too far that it becomes annoying replaying certain areas over and over. There's enough ammo and health to survive, but not too much that you can afford to waste them.

On completion of the main game you'll unlock the "Professional" difficulty, which truly is hard with enemies hurting more, taking more damage and being even smarter. If that wasn't enough there are also an impressive amount of Extras packed into RE4. Along with the 4 shooting galleries hidden within the game that unlock many RE4-themed bottle caps, and some excellent unlockable weapons like infinite rocket launchers and super powerful machine guns, completing the game unlocks 3 extra modes. The first which I won't spoil for you, offers players a chance to relieve the final few parts of the game from a different characters perspective. It's nothing much different but interesting to play through all the same as it gives you a different ending. The second, which is exclusive to the PS2 version, takes things a whole step further and offers 5 chapters (each around an hour long), all of which take part throughout different stages of the main story. It mostly retreads what you’ve already done with a different character, but it actually blends in rather well. At times you’ll actually see parts of Leon’s story as they happen, so it fills in a few gaps and answers the odd questions about the history and motives on the various characters throughout the story.

However, the final mode, 'Mercenaries', could have been a game in itself. Basically, you're dropped into one of four levels with just a few guns and items. You then have to basically kill as many enemies as you can before the time runs out. The timer can be extended by picking up hour glass timers giving you more time to score points, but also longer to try and stay alive. Be warned - you die and you don't get a score. Combo's are achieved by killing enemies in quick succession and are the key to the high scores. There are new enemies to fight and new characters to control in 'Mercenaries', but my lips are sealed on those.

As anyone with working eyes can see, Resident Evil 4 is graphically stunning. Character models are incredibly smooth with detailed facial features. Enemy design is never anything less than competent. The standard earlier enemies are all satisfyingly threatening, while some of the boss designs are simply outstanding. The environments are simply huge. One scene involves riding a cable cart and you can see way out into the mountains and spot villagers from what seems miles away. Simply take out a sniper rifle and you'll be able to shoot them. They're also quite varied, with a handful of distinct settings throughout. The environments bring depth and realism to the game, and rarely reminds you that you are in fact playing ,just that, a game. There are numerous special effects throughout that impress too. The rain constantly patters off Leon's shoulders and can be seen slamming down hard on the ground. Realistic weather is rarely done well in games. Things like animating the leaves on trees to simulate wind convincingly, heat haze and sun glare, decent rain and water reflection effects - these are all things that are processor-intensive and rarely bothered with.

When someone does them, and does them well, you suddenly realize what you've been missing. Fire is common effect to use in videogames, but I've not seen it better replicated than here. It's not just effects that make the game world impressive either. Things like animals populate certain areas of the game, many of which will react to you. The art direction too is consistent, similar to say Metroid Prime, helps a great deal in creating a world you can't help but be sucked in to. Cut scenes are also a huge step up from the previous games and even show the likes of Hideo Kojima a trick or two. Technically, it's not quite perfect. Textures can occasionally be downright ugly while the framerate which drops now and again combined with the compressed looking cutscene videos prevent it from achieving full marks graphically. Also, due to Leon standing in the middle of the screen, 4:3 owners will have borders to deal with. It's understandable why Capcom wanted to make the game in 16:9 to allow a wider viewing angle, but it does mean that those without a widescreen TV will suffer a smaller viewing size.

The PS2 version actually supports a 16:9 mode, but it's nothing more than a cheeky 'zoomed' 4:3 image rather than a true 16:9 picture, but overall, the PS2 version is surprisingly close the GC original. But put them side by side and the GC is a clear winner, even manually ‘zoomed’ in on a 16:9 TV. The textures are noticeably sharper and less bland in certain areas, while a lot of lighting is missing from the PS2 edition, changing the atmosphere of some environments completely. I particularly remember one part near the start of the game where you’re in a long, deep valley with huge doors at the other side. On the GameCube there was a certain haunting atmosphere generated by the mist and subtle beams of light coming from the sky. On the PS2 however the whole place looked disappointingly brown and lacked that certain feeling that it originally had.



The new Plagas-removing gun, exclusive to PS2/.

The new Plagas-removing gun, exclusive to PS2/.
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Sound plays a big part in survival horror games and RE4 doesn't fall short here. Be it weather effects such as howling winds and thrashing rain or the sound of enemies shouting down large echoing halls, RE4 always provides a fitting atmospheric background ambience, made all the better with fantastic Dolby Pro Logic II support. The soundtrack is equally appropriate with tunes lending themselves to past RE games and even the odd track sounding rather like Silent Hill in places. The sound also plays a part in the actual gameplay as you never quite know when an area's clear. When you can kill all the enemies the insane scary music will stop - but that's only when all the enemies who have seen you are dead, so you're always kept on your toes. Voice acting is reasonably solid. It's not anywhere near as convincing as say Metal Gear Solid 3 or Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas, but the script has a slight cheesy charm to it and overall it's by far the best seen from Capcom in regards to voice work. Metal Gear Solid style codec cut scenes are also used, but they mainly just to bring you up to speed with story and are relatively short and snappy, so no emotional rambles like the aforementioned game.

No game is without its faults and Resident Evil 4 isn't about the change that, despite how minor they are. My first complaint is about the lack of some kind of quick select weapon system that could have been in place on the d-pad. Like I mentioned earlier, although more often than not you find yourself needing to pause it to give you time to decide which weapon would be best for the situation, it would have been nice to put something like grenades on the d-pad for easy access. The lack of big scares is something that die hard Resident Evil fans may miss. RE4 is much more geared towards feelings of panic and despair rather than fear. That's not to say it doesn't have its fair share of scares, just not many preset 'jump out of your seat' moments as the older titles had. My last complaint is really just for those who have already sampled it on Nintendo’s machine. It’s not as pretty for starters, and the inferior analog stick and use of analog buttons mean it’s a pain to control at times. And then there’s the prerecorded cutscenes which just aren’t as good by comparison as they remind you it’s a game, and in a game like this where immersion is so important, it’s a shame. The PS2 extras are a welcome addition and it’s easy to recommend picking it up again just for some more RE4, but ultimately it just doesn’t feel the same.

Capcom have done an amazing, absolutely admirable job in making a Resident Evil that has the potential to appeal to so many different people. Many people, myself included, who got tired of RE’s tiring formula, and even those who have never shown interest in the series, can thoroughly enjoy what RE4 offers. To the relief of fans, there is no doubting it feels like Resident Evil. From the classic herb mixing, to Leon’s past, to tiny little things like the font of the text or the sounds within the menu, they all make this feel like Resident Evil. But there are also the little things that have been neglected in previous games, and many games in general to be honest. Firstly it tries to erase unnecessary frustration at every possible opportunity. Being able to equip the knife with ease is a good example, then there are the regular mini checkpoints that prevent tedious backtracking through an area. Save points don’t require ink ribbons further relieve frustration, while the menu interface is simple and easy to navigate. Also if you go into your menu screen you can check out your last 'codec' conversation so if you happened to be coming back to the game from long time away from it you can quickly get up to speed with what's happening and with the addition of a red marker on map showing your next destination, where you need to go next. It just feels like a quality title throughout.

Here is a game that not only lived up to the hype, but also far surpassed anyone and everyone’s expectations. Resident Evil 4 is a game that completely revitalized a series that was getting stale, creating an unforgettable experience and is, by far, the best game in the series. The best way to get enjoyment from Resident Evil 4 is to treat it as a heavily atmospheric adventure game. It's not scary the same way Capcom's previous games were in relying on jump-tactics, but the experience is much the better for it. Resident Evil has a satisfyingly deep combat system, jaw dropping boss fights and a perfectly judged difficulty. It's both visually and aurally stunning, is over 20 hrs long and is packed with extras (including the sublime Mercenaries) and has some of the most fantastic pacing which is forever keeping the player busy from one location to the next. The game somehow knows just when you're beginning to tire of a certain section as within minutes it progresses somewhere else with yet another amazing set piece after amazing set piece.

While the PS2 version does suffer in the control and visual department, the two most important aspects of the game, hence not quite obtaining the top score the GC version received earlier in the year despite the extra content, it’s an essential game on whatever format you pick it up on. Turn off the lights, switch on the surround sound and prepare for an experience that won't be matched again for a long time. Game of the year? Few could argue otherwise.
The Score
While the GC version is superior in key areas, RE4 is still an absolutely fantastic game and arguably this generation’s finest. Miss it at your own peril.
Looking to buy this game right now? PALGN recommends www.Play-Asia.com.

Related Resident Evil 4 Content

Win Resident Evil 4 and a Chainsaw Controller
13 Feb, 2006 Here's your chance to win PALGN's GOTY of 2005.
PS2 Resident Evil 4 to come with widescreen mode
17 Aug, 2005 To the chagrin of Cube owners everywhere.
PS2 Resident Evil 4 dated
05 Aug, 2005 Capcom classic scheduled for pre-Christmas release in Europe and Australia.
39 Comments
8 years ago
while i hated 1-3, and not really getting into the GC version (after only an admittedly short amount of playtime) i'll probably rent this over the holidays and see if it's something i can see myself spending money on.

if it is, i might even buy a GC to play it on, especially as i've found a store with some Twin Snakes in stock.
8 years ago
ObsoletE wrote
while i hated 1-3, and not really getting into the GC version (after only an admittedly short amount of playtime) i'll probably rent this over the holidays and see if it's something i can see myself spending money on.

if it is, i might even buy a GC to play it on, especially as i've found a store with some Twin Snakes in stock.
It is definately a great game, and it gets better as you go through icon_smile.gif

Interesting to see that there's just that little bit of atmosphere lost on the PS2 version, might pick it up when the PS3 comes out and this is dirt to cheap to play the added stuff.
8 years ago
I was browsing through that, and when you say
Quote
and new characters to control in 'Mercenaries', but my lips are sealed on those.
does that mean that there are characters only in the PS2 version, or is it just refering to the characters in both versions that you can't control in the other modes.

Either way I need to finish Mercenaries.
8 years ago
Did this every even appear in the Australian sales charts? It's been out for a month (I think) in Australia, and as far as I can tell has never even cracked the PS2 top 10, let alone the all format. And no, they're not basically the same thing anymore, a few weeks back the 7 out of 10 games on the chart were DS and GBA games.

The Gamecube version didn't crack the all format top 10 either (although it's been in the GC charts ever since it's release - not that that means much), but so much for the port gaining additional sales for RE4.

Anyone know how it's done elsewhere? Is it possible Capcom killed off sales of the GCN version by announcing the PS2 port, and then didn't even pick up many sales of the port? And their actions led the creator of such a great game to leave the company? Sucks to be them.

EDIT: It's true - I just checked the US charts. RE4 was out for a week in october there, and didn't even make the all format top 20, or the PS2 top 10. The GC version topped (and dominated) the all format charts in January, and stayed on the charts for a while too (at least a couple of months - I'll check that when I get home).
8 years ago
I don't think anyone was expecting this game to outsell the GameCube version, since not a lot of people would bother waiting almost a year for a downgraded version. But for the PS2 only gamers, I think this is a great choice, since it's probably one of the finest looking games on the console.

And the Australian charts hardly measure how well a game is performing, since we never receive numbers along side them. I don't think Capcom ever had the intention of outselling the GameCube version, but only to expand the appeal of the game to a much broader audience - since the GameCube has a limited demographic.
8 years ago
Mark wrote
I don't think Capcom ever had the intention of outselling the GameCube version, but only to expand the appeal of the game to a much broader audience - since the GameCube has a limited demographic.
Actually, they did. They released a press release that said they planned on selling 2 million copies of the PS2 version at about the time the GC version had sold 1.5 million (April I think).

As you can see in my edit to the post above, RE4 on PS2 has sunk without a trace in the US also. So capcom pissed a lot of people off (not the least of which was the series creator), and it seems gained nothing.
8 years ago
DancesInUnderwear wrote
I was browsing through that, and when you say
Quote
and new characters to control in 'Mercenaries', but my lips are sealed on those.
does that mean that there are characters only in the PS2 version, or is it just refering to the characters in both versions that you can't control in the other modes.

Either way I need to finish Mercenaries.
Yes, it's the latter, there's no 'new' characters in the PS2 version. And yes, you do need to finish Mercenaries mode icon_wink.gif
8 years ago
David: On the Most Wanted list it's #3 or something in Japan - it will probably do alright there.

As for America, The GC version opened at #2 In America selling 319k. I don't have exact numbers to date, but it has definately sold over 500k in the US (from the bits and peices of numbers that I've seen, presumably)

As for Japanese charts, all I know is that it sold 117k on the first day.

Considering it's popularity on the GC, and also that Japanese consumers by PS2s like they buy toilet paper, there is a very good chance that it will do well.

PS: Great review.
8 years ago
Nick wrote
David: On the Most Wanted list it's #3 or something in Japan - it will probably do alright there.
neither version will really do 'alright there' - see below.

Quote
As for America, The GC version opened at #2 In America selling 319k.
Incorrect. it was the No1 selling game for january in the US.

January 2005
1. Resident Evil 4 (GC)
2. Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas (PS2)
3. The Legend of Zelda: The Minish Cap (GBA)
4. Mercenaries (Xbox)
5. Mercenaries (PS2)
6. Need for Speed: Underground 2 (PS2)
7. Halo 2 (Xbox)
8. Madden NFL 2005 - (PS2)
9. Kingdom Hearts: Chain of Memories (GBA)
10. Super Mario 64 (DS)

February 2005
(snip)
8. Resident Evil 4 (GC)

The PS2 version has tanked in the US. It was out for a full week in October, but was not in the October top 20 all format chart, or the PS2 top 10, as published by NPD.

Source:
http://www.gamespot.com/news/6140404.html

Quote
As for Japanese charts, all I know is that it sold 117k on the first day.
Considering it's popularity on the GC, and also that Japanese consumers by PS2s like they buy toilet paper, there is a very good chance that it will do well.
the GC version dissapeared from the japanese top 20 after one week. The japanese don't really like the series that much, so we'll see how it does there next week.
8 years ago
Chris wrote
And yes, you do need to finish Mercenaries mode icon_wink.gif
I tried, but I suck. Bad. Might give it another shot tomorrow though, just because you said to.
8 years ago
*kicks my source*

Interesting info.

Of well, I'm looking forward to RE5 now anyway. It'll be interesting to see how that goes, after the Gc and PS2 versions of RE4 will be talked about on the internet for a while to come.
8 years ago
Nick wrote
*kicks my source*
icon_lol.gif


Quote
Of well, I'm looking forward to RE5 now anyway. It'll be interesting to see how that goes, after the Gc and PS2 versions of RE4 will be talked about on the internet for a while to come.
I'm more looking forward to whatever Mikami's next project will be at clover studios. I hope it's another horror piece, but with some new idea.

Damn I wish he was doing RE5.
8 years ago
For US.

PS2 RESIDENT EVIL 4 39,432
PS2 RESIDENT EVIL 4: PREMIER EDITION 25,996

Keep in mind it came out 25/10, and had a bit of competition.

GC version LTD is pretty fine still - will get a good boost when it goes to Player's Choice.

GC Resident Evil 4 (Capcom) 574,245

Biohazard 4 for PS2 comes out in Japan on Thursday.

Quote
The japanese don't really like the series that much
They sure don't icon_wink.gif

Numbers in millions

PS Capcom Bio Hazard 2 (all versions) 2.30
PS Capcom Bio Hazard 3 ~ Last Escape 1.55
PS Capcom Bio Hazard (all versions) 1.30

From memory the remake and Biohazard 0 both made ~300k, when the install base was much smaller. No clue on Code Veronica.
8 years ago
Where do you get the sales totals? I can only ever find charts - which obviosly don't tell the whole story.
8 years ago
I'm embarrassed to say I still haven't picked up the GCN version! I'm now waiting until I move back into our newly rennovated house and get my new TV and sound set up to play it on. I think it'll be worth the wait to go from a 38cm 4:3 LG to an 82cm 16:9 Panasonic!

That should be just about the time I finish Half Life 2 on Xbox, and finish off my make-up exams for uni as well.
8 years ago
David wrote
It's been out for a month (I think) in Australia
has it really been out a month?

i only saw it for the first time on shelves last week, figured it came out then.
8 years ago
ObsoletE wrote
while i hated 1-3, and not really getting into the GC version (after only an admittedly short amount of playtime) i'll probably rent this over the holidays and see if it's something i can see myself spending money on.

if it is, i might even buy a GC to play it on, especially as i've found a store with some Twin Snakes in stock.
Omg how can you hate Resident Evil 2, it is like the pinnacle of gaming, it has it all, no game has ever been better in all round greatness since Re2 IMHO.
8 years ago
Spanca wrote
I'm embarrassed to say I still haven't picked up the GCN version! I'm now waiting until I move back into our newly rennovated house and get my new TV and sound set up to play it on. I think it'll be worth the wait to go from a 38cm 4:3 LG to an 82cm 16:9 Panasonic!

That should be just about the time I finish Half Life 2 on Xbox, and finish off my make-up exams for uni as well.
I don't think the GC version will look all that great on a 16:9 screen as the game isn't presented on true 16:9, it just has black bars running top and bottom. I think all you'll end up with is a squashed image or a game with black bars running on either side of it. Not sure which...

Still, don't let that stop you. RE4 is one of the best games of the year, as you probably already know. And I'd personally prefer the GC version over the PS2 version based on the amount of atmosphere it has over the PS2.
8 years ago
Lahiru wrote
I don't think the GC version will look all that great on a 16:9 screen as the game isn't presented on true 16:9, it just has black bars running top and bottom. I think all you'll end up with is a squashed image or a game with black bars running on either side of it. Not sure which...
From the review:
chris wrote
But put them side by side and the GC is a clear winner, even manually ‘zoomed’ in on a 16:9 TV.
8 years ago
Matt wrote
The Nintendo GameCube is pretty fine still - will get a good boost when it goes to Player's Choice.
There better be a Player's Choice version.
8 years ago
Lahiru wrote
Spanca wrote
I'm embarrassed to say I still haven't picked up the GCN version! I'm now waiting until I move back into our newly rennovated house and get my new TV and sound set up to play it on. I think it'll be worth the wait to go from a 38cm 4:3 LG to an 82cm 16:9 Panasonic!

That should be just about the time I finish Half Life 2 on Xbox, and finish off my make-up exams for uni as well.
I don't think the GC version will look all that great on a 16:9 screen as the game isn't presented on true 16:9, it just has black bars running top and bottom. I think all you'll end up with is a squashed image or a game with black bars running on either side of it. Not sure which...

Still, don't let that stop you. RE4 is one of the best games of the year, as you probably already know. And I'd personally prefer the GC version over the PS2 version based on the amount of atmosphere it has over the PS2.
erm, why would that matter? I can still play in 4:3 if I want, or I can zoom to fit. I'm in nothing but a better position than an 4:3-only TV owner.
8 years ago
Just incase I didn't make it 100% clear in the review, the PS2's 16:9 mode is just stretched. It's no different than using a zoom mode on a 16:9 TV with the GC version, you're getting the same resolution either way. Personally, if your TV has a 14:9 mode then that looks best to be honest. It fills the screen more than 4:3 but looks a bit better due to the smaller viewing size of 16:9.
8 years ago
This new TV has 14:9 icon_smile.gif
8 years ago
That was an extremely long review for just a port. icon_razz.gif
I am still quite unsure about whether I want to get this PS2 version. I am happy with my Gamecube version, but the thought of Ada's quest is almost enough to warrant another purchase. Guess I will wait for the price to decrease a bit and then decide from there. icon_confused.gif
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Australian Release Date:
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European Release Date:
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Publisher:
  Capcom Entertainment
Developer:
  Capcom Entertainment
Players:
  1

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