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Jeremy Jastrzab
19 Jan, 2012

The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword Review

Wii Review | The reason to play games.
Video games have been around long enough to allow for some series to take their rightful place as icons of the medium. 2011 saw major anniversaries for some these gaming icons, including 10 years for Halo (yes, it’s been that long) and 20 years for Sonic the Hedgehog. Arguably the biggest anniversary would have to be the 25th anniversary for a series that has, over that time, gone on to define and redefine genres, and occasionally single-handedly drive the triple-A game design template - The Legend of Zelda. The latest addition to the venerable series, The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword, is a fitting and fantastic way to celebrate what has been, and continues to be, one of the brightest shining beacons of video game medium.

Over the course of 25 years, the series has constantly looked to innovate and bring new elements to the table, while still managing to retain a consistent spirit across a rather convoluted timeline. The Ancient Battle over the fate of Hyrule, between the competing Triforce elements reached its zenith in 1998 with Ocarina of Time, which is still considered to be the paragon of console gaming. Despite producing nothing but gems, subsequent titles always had the unenviable task of living up to this legacy, and since Majora’s Mask, the pressures to produce have clearly weighed down one of the most heavily debated series in gaming, as the fanboys frothed at the mouth over the tiniest of details with no sign of ever being satiated.

It begins... for real this time!

It begins... for real this time!
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Hence, to understand and better appreciate The Legend of Zelda series post-Ocarina, it’s much more appropriate to look at the series as the Hayao Miyazaki of games; along with Nintendo’s brash attempt to go its own way, The Legend of Zelda series has taken a stance of being the best of its own title, with its own sense of identity, endearing innocence, storybook adventure and gameplay excellence. Just as you always know when you’re watching a Miyazaki movie, you always know when you’re playing a Legend of Zelda game. For what it no longer does to be the paragon of the medium, Skyward Sword boldly embodies a unique experience that cannot be found in any other title. And it’s the first console Zelda title since Marjora’s Mask that doesn’t blatantly feel like it was rushed, unlike the issues surrounding the dungeons cut for the holiday release of Wind Waker or the system transfer of Twilight Princess.

The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword goes back and attempts to establish the beginning of the convoluted series timeline. This is the story of how many of the iconic elements in the series came about, from something as small as the protagonist Link’s uniform to the formation of the Kingdom of Hyrule and the relationship between Link, the Princess Zelda and future antagonists. The adventure itself, like a Miyazaki movie, purports a beautiful sense of youthful vigour and innocence; the coming-of-age story of a young man’s attempt to rescue his childhood sweetheart unknowingly sets them on the destined path towards the rise to become the Hero of Legend, the Princess of valour and the inception of the eternal rivalry between Power and Courage.

The sky is no longer the limit.

The sky is no longer the limit.
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In spite of Nintendo’s refusal to add voicing, and some predictable outcomes, Skyward Sword is the perfect tonic to the proliferation of testosterone-induced tub-thumping loud machoistic gaming affairs that have been a dime-a-dozen in the modern area. It shows what a truly ‘mature’ title is supposed to be; retaining the makings of a tale for the ages, subtly clever, humorous and witty themes and dialogue and all without a single extremely violent, crude or overtly sexual moment. It goes back to a time when a game was a game, looking to tell a tale that (like a great animated movie) provides a window into the soul of youth and is genuinely accessible to anyone that appreciates a finely designed product. Skyward Sword represents the ideal marriage of classic animation sensibilities and triple-A gaming. And like a good storybook, as opposed to a wide-open sandbox or confined corridor, Skyward Sword has a well-defined beginning and end, which allows the setting, characters and gameplay to shine and do one thing; play.

At the time the Wii was released, HD adoption was still pretty low and it could get away with being a standard definition console. By 2011 though, the Wii is creaking out of the collective consciousness with developers complaining about the lack of processing power on offer (amongst other things). But just as Metroid Prime provided a master class on the GameCube how limited disc space on offer can be expertly utilised, Skyward Sword shows up a significant portion of the modern HD titles out there with vastly superior attention to artistic detail and technical prowess. It manages to squeeze every last sinew of power from the Wii, but unlike a title such as Shadow of the Colossus, never lets on that it’s maxing out the system.

It's not Zelda without attacking plants.

It's not Zelda without attacking plants.
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But it’s not the power squeezed out of the system that’s impressive, but a meticulous attention to the artistic detail of the game, proving that (with a bit of calibration) a Wii title can indeed compete with this HD generation. Forgoing a lot of modern techniques, the team at Nintendo has clearly stuck to what they do best, in creating an artistic masterpiece that will still look fantastic in the years to come. Mixing a style somewhere between the more relatable Ocarina of Time and the cel-shaded cartoon flavour of Wind Waker, the team builds an eclectic mix of superlative animation, rich colour, lively vibrance, passionate flair and a unique flavour to its surroundings that can only be found in a Legend of Zelda title. In an exceedingly impressive manner, the game runs virtually flawlessly, with barely a second of slow down and not a single load screen. Now what HD title can boast that?

The lack of voicing has been a contentious issue for the series, but the title manages to dodge poor dialog and voicing, which is so profligate in modern gaming. Sure enough, the ‘sim-lish’ language somewhat feels like it has run its course, but it’s more an odd design choice to disallow control of text speed and skipping. In any case, voices are hardly missed as the facial expression and cinematic direction combined with a magical soundtrack still do a wonderful job of conveying emotion and the overall theme of the game. The soundtrack itself keeps in the theme of innocence, growth and adventure, with the kinds of tunes that you’ll be hearing long after the console is switched off, and never taking the pedal off from a journey that’s nothing but enjoyable and buoyant.

Watching for the cues to success.

Watching for the cues to success.
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Skyward Sword does a fantastic job of blending the spirit of series with a new setting. It starts off in Skyloft, an island above the clouds, where history has forgotten what lay beneath. As a ‘sky knight’ in training, this era’s Link gets around with his trusty mountable bird (the loftwing). Traversing the skies is much more endearing and dynamic than traversing the seas of Wind Waker and a lovely change of pace from the back of Epona. There is a lot to discover, plenty of side quests to undertake and mini-games play, and these only multiply in number as you continue playing. Each time you return to the sky there will be something new to see or find. As enjoyable as it is, it does feel like there could have been a greater scope of exploration though, though this could also come down to limitations of the Wii.

Aside from being the Zelda title that should have been launched with the Wii, Skyward Sword almost single-handedly creates the most comprehensive motion controlled core title since the inception of motion gaming. Furthermore, it shows that had the Wii been originally been released with Motion-Plus capabilities, the entire generation of game development could have taken a whole different course, over dodgy mini-game and waggle fests. Just about everything is controlled with pretty much the ideal and relatively intuitive mix of motion and convention. And as far as the control and integrity of the motion control, it’s about 90% of the way where it should be. If anything is missing, it’s the ability for the system to adapt without fully simulated motions, and the occasional stiff motions, such as those associated with the bug net.

Hope you've learned the combat by now... you'll need it.

Hope you've learned the combat by now... you'll need it.
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It’s ambitious, and while not quite at the level of proficiency as expected from a traditional controller, it does enough to provide an experience that feels different and unique from its predecessors while rarely being a hindrance across the entire span of the adventure. It makes you feel like you’re the hero behind the sword or the bow, and a traditional scheme is never really missed or preferred. Intelligently, everything has been moulded so that it all still fits within the context of being a game, even the interface, while making sure that most mistakes are at fault of the user rather than the game. Motion additions such as the Beetle, gameplay differences such as the addition of a stamina gauge allowing for a more athletic Link and subsequent design changes have been brought together to make things feel fresh enough.

However, an aspect that could have been better, is the overall progression of the combat. While it may not be one-to-one exactly, the gameplay mechanics are designed so that it doesn’t need to always be and the combat starts out great. If you’re patient and understand the mechanics, the combat is excellent and allows for a lot of dynamic actions, creating a whole new system to play with. Unfortunately, there is a stark lack of enemy variety to make use of this system, which becomes apparent all too quickly, and there are one-percenter errors that hold it back from being amazing. It’s a great system but one that doesn’t utilise its full potential... which seems like an unfortunate hang over from trying to keep the game accessible.

Bosses still take centre stage.

Bosses still take centre stage.
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There has been a lot said about the formulaic approach taken to the structure of Zelda titles, and for all the changes brought in by building a game around motion control, this feature remains fairly consistent. However, to say that the formula needs to be changed or refreshed (without offering any alternative...) is paramount to saying that Halo needs to be played from third person, Mario needs a gun or that Sonic needs to slow down. This is what a Zelda title is and what makes it a unique experience (with Darksiders being the only clone in over half a decade). Rather than this template adherence being a bad thing, Skyward Sword has some of the most enjoyable and mind-bending dungeons in the series. There aren’t any really sprawling or multileveled designs, but they fit in much better within the context of the environment and you’ll still see a lot that you’ve never seen before, even though you’ll have a much better chance of getting through them if you’re an experienced campaigner.

Skyward Sword gets off to a very slow start, which is dangerous in this age of instantaneous gratification, though you probably need another hobby if you’re going to pass judgement on the first 15 minutes of this game. The ‘tutorial’ goes on for a little bit too long, and many experienced players will get irked by the constant meddling of your ‘help’, as Fi provides this generation’s Navi. This wouldn’t be so bad if you could turn her off or limit her help... Still, she can actually provide some genuine help when you’re stuck. In any case, the players hand doesn’t really need to be held as tight as it is. After the slow start though, the gameplay cooks at a considered but ideal pace, where you slowly earn new items to open up more of the game, and the design becomes appropriately more challenging, requiring you to use everything at your disposal to get through the obstacles in front of you. It got to a point where the mind was ticking over at a furious pace, thinking about the best way to get past everything in front of Link while happily shooting off to explore the numerous side tracks along the way.

Redefining the leap of faith.

Redefining the leap of faith.
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It isn’t until roughly 75 per cent through the game that the challenge truly opens up, where all dungeons and obstacles will have you sifting through pretty much all your items and tools. It’s at this stage that the design is at its most endearing and enjoyable, particularly for veterans of the series. Now while this applies to primarily the main quest, one area that Skyward Sword doesn’t do too well is the amount of fetch quests masquerading as side quests, which try and artificially expand the experience. This is a real shame, because the amount of variety that’s been squeezed into the game is actually quite impressive, but occasionally unnoticeable through the phases that you’re playing delivery boy. Finding and getting some of the deliveries can actually be fun and make good use of a more athletic Link, such as catapulting yourself from the top of high structures (which is nowhere near used enough), but at the same time, he’s probably too reliant on dowsing. On the plus side, there’s no tedious Triforce collection like in Wind Waker or arduously repetitive grind like in Phantom Hourglass and the God-forsaken Temple of the Ocean King.

In effect, it’s not the dungeon formula that needs refreshing, but the need to make more ambitious ways of completing some of the game’s other tasks, which again points to hangover from making the game accessible. Probably the most unfortunate hangover from this mantra is the lack of scope to the overall game. Each of the environments, and the even the sky, are all wonderfully varied and well-designed, many of the enemies are clever and there is a good mix of the new and old items, but simply, there is the overriding feeling that all these aspects really could have and should been wider reaching, especially enemy variety. Again though, this could have been a system limitation. Still, even when an excess of 50 hours were spent covering just about every nook and cranny of the sky and ground, there was still more to find, and additions such as treasure collection and item upgrades make this one of the most content packed experiences, Zelda or not, available. While the difficulty is ‘accessible’, Hero mode unlocked at the end of the game will give the experienced players out there a good run.

Here's to another 25 years.

Here's to another 25 years.
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Taking away the expectation that The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword is meant to revolutionise and lead the gaming medium, and taking away the expectation that it’s meant to surpass Ocarina of Time is quite liberating. You can then see that it’s a franchise akin to being the Miyazaki of video games; a beacon of unique gaming philosophy that shines with indefatigable quality, defiance to modern convention and an endearing innocence that sets it apart from a sea of loud and brash wannabes, making it the quintessential fantasy storybook gaming adventure. It is immensely enjoyable, immensely huge and finely designed to create a unique, pure and vintage tille, completely befitting a 25th anniversary, while (almost) creating the definitive motion controlled experience. Rather than looking at the flaws as that, they ought to be viewed as ways that the series can still continually improve on itself, for hopefully another 25 years. It mightn’t be the greatest game ever created, but The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword, for mine, is the greatest reason to turn on the console and be part of the fledgling medium of video games.
The Score
A magnificent homage for the 25th anniversary of one the biggest franchises in gaming, The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword provides a compelling gaming and artistic showcase for the indefatigable potential of the medium as a whole, and a reason to have gaming as a hobby.
Looking to buy this game right now? PALGN recommends www.Play-Asia.com.

Related The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword Content

Nintendo to release Zelda art book
15 Dec, 2011 Celebrating the legend.
Skyward Sword five minute overview trailer
02 Nov, 2011 Spoiling you with spoilers.
The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword harp trailer
23 Oct, 2011 Let me play you the song of my people.
77 Comments
2 years ago
could not disagree with you more.This game basically confirmed that Nintendo have no clue what they're doing anymore. Everything seems like 1 step forward 4 steps back.

Take the new stamina bar for example, sure it gives us a newly more athletic link wich I dug, but then they chuck the stamina on things like climbing vines, pushing blocks and carrying shit? So now to push a block over to a switch I have to take a break in the middle of it and wait for my stamina to go up again? Or I have to rush through every climbing bit and not actually explore for fear of falling to my death?

Or the filter on the game, on the one hand when it works it looks great, and I love the idea that they're trying something new in a game giving it the whole impressionistic art style, on the other hand it only works like 1 time out of every 3 and leaves the game looking like a blury mess every other time.

The motion controls are straight up broken, trying to get those eyes to follow my sword was frustrating as hell, and I ended up stopping playing when the game would constantly reset my my wii+ thing and lock it's defualt position as being like behind links head or something and make the game unplayable. And even when it does work, it's done in a way that there is no way you can hold the wii-mote that doesn't make link look like a complete spaz running around.

And that's not even starting on fucking Fi. Seriously even if the rest of the game had been perfect I would have taken two points off just for her.
2 years ago
I'm currently right at the end of the game and the final series of quests is really taxing my patience. It's back to the same areas for the 4th or 5th time. There's just not enough new to make it entertaining and there's so much friction everywhere. This is the 1,000th item I've picked up, you do not need to pause the game, explain what it is then take me to the inventory screen. Just let me play the damn thing. Fi is useless, says what you only what know and gives you no additional help when you actually need it. The controls are frustrating and the graphics are making my eyes water!

At the start of the game I had mixed feelings, after a few hours I began to really love it, but now I just wish it was over.
2 years ago
Agree with the above two posters.

I was "meh" at the start of the game, then after the first 2 temples i started to enjoy the game, but when i had to go revisit old areas again to do boring and childish quests...i seriously had to force myself to sit down and finish the game. The "filler" content in between temples was just poor quality.

I also agree with the stamina bar that Benza mentioned. It didnt add anything besides a limitation on what you could do. There is nothing fun about having to stand around waiting for a bar to fill up before you can climb a vine or push something.

I did enjoy most of the temples though, and the story was decent enough to hold my attention. I loved how we learn more about Ganon and the Master Sword as well.

Im just glad i finished it icon_surprised.gif
2 years ago
"The sky is no longer the limit." LOL I GET IT jason derulo must think, "well i beg to differ..."

aniiways yesss the item keeps reintroducing after continuing i hate that the most, FI is annoying... but its part of navi's charm, grafics psssssh.... name another creature that is cuter then the kiwiks >.< if it was realistic it wont look cute nemore

kinda sux that link cant run and cut like in TP, have to stop then swing, the stamina thing IS GOOD, every game has it and they too dont last forever (BF3 soldiers most be on steroids cuz i dont see them run out of breathe)

there is more stuff to do but there isnt any room to explore and yes revisit the same place for 4th 5th time sux, upgrading is a keeper for the series...

BUT i never get lost cuz of the constant reminder of FI and mystic man.... whereas skyrim i get lost constanly, and that sux more than aniithing this games quirks have
2 years ago
watching for the "queues" to success?
"cues" perhaps?
2 years ago
I just have to say, there are some pretty major spoilers for the game contained in those screenshots. icon_neutral.gif One of them shows the boss from the fifth dungeon...
2 years ago
NPC: "Well, I'd like to help you, Link, but it seems I don't have [item x]. You could try looking for it over in [area y]."
Fi: "Master, we should try looking in [area y] for [item x]. I calculate a 90% probability that having [item x] will allow us to progress the quest."

2 minutes pass. Link is, like, right next to the item.

Fi: "Master Link, my calculations indicate that this is [item x] that [NPC] was talking about. We should take this item to [NPC] quickly. Do you need assistance locating [NPC]?"

Without exaggeration, that is literally all Fi does. That, and look TERRIFYING when you learn a song.

But yes, Fi aside, the game really improves when you're on the ground. I was seriously sick of the hand-holding in the sky tutorial, it felt like hours up there. Anyway, once all that passed, I actually started enjoying the game, despite my incompetence with some of the sword controls. It's not a fantastic game, but it's definitely enjoyable, and the story from the third dungeon onwards is great.

I agree with the review about how they could/should have greatly increased the ground from the 3 main areas. I grew thoroughly sick of visiting the same places, especially when getting the 4 pieces of the song there. It's like, wow. Forest. This would be really fun if I hadn't already been here 15 times before this latest fetch quest.
2 years ago
This game is the console version of Phantom Hourglass/Spirit Tracks.

FILTH.

All the equipment has been seen in past Zelda's except for the Beetle, the bow is obtained as the 2nd last item (so your stuck with the shitty slingshot if you want to roleplay archer Link) and copy pasting the game design from the DS games (including directly lifting the tablets from Spirit Tracks...).

At least the 5th boss (which is that cyclops tentacle thing) was an interesting fight. And he looks like one of the cast from Monsters Inc.
2 years ago
admeister wrote
I just have to say, there are some pretty major spoilers for the game contained in those screenshots. icon_neutral.gif One of them shows the boss from the fifth dungeon...
yeah the screenshots spoiled something for me icon_sad.gif

I just did the 4th dungeon last night.

I'm quite enjoying the dungeons, they are all quite fun and unique.

However, as everyone said, and as a 'slouch/lay down on the couch gamer' the motion controls frustrate me. Simple things such as throwing a bomb, or flicking a switch, just made life twice as frustrating.

Swimming with motion controls also was VERY annoying, because you cannot reset motion plus like you can with items...

I found the enemies where you have to swing your sword at a certain angle ended up swinging in the wrong direction, i have resorted to the waggle.

Same goes with like a particular door I just came across where you had to hit in with different direction attacks to unlock it... you try and do it right and it just doesn't happen.

The lack of exploration is also disappointing... it would be nice if you could simply walk from the Forest to the Desert, Volcano to Forest etc.. without having to fly up ....

OH and as people have said picking up items and going through the menu and the explanation every time is SO ANNOYING! Same with Fi, like when a door opens and she pops up to say 'there is a 90% chance that door will take you further into the dungeon'... Thanks Fi... realllllly helpful.

The story has me very interested, but gameplay wise besides dungeons I'm simply not as interested and IMO Twilight Princess is the better game.

Not saying I hate it, but I would defiantly not consider anything close to Ocarina of Time.

------------
IMO Zelda needs to completely have a reboot.
-Remove the musical instruments.
-Remove the same/similar sound tracks that are in each game.
-Change up the items... Soon as I saw a weird thing on the wall with a dot in it im like 'im not even gunna waste my time investigating until I get the hook/claw shot.'
-Ditch the navi/Fi helper thing.
-Ditch Z targeting

IMO its time to give Zelda a completely new look and move on from clutching onto features that made Ocarina great.

Everything simply feels too familiar IMO.

(all spoken from a massive Zelda fan)
2 years ago
The negativity in this thread reassures me. After seeing the 9.5, i was worried that i would be in the minority. The flaws in the game are just too overwhelming.

Keep fighting the good fight PALGN users.
2 years ago
I just make my character in Dark Souls look like Link and pretend it's a Zelda game.
2 years ago
I enjoyed the game heaps, had fun with my 50 or so hours with it. Yes the formula hasn't changed much and some of the back tracking got kind of boring - but they tried to break it up. haha. But yeah... I found myself really hooked once I got into it and didn't stop, so I must of had fun. I know story isn't important in a Zelda game, but I really did enjoy it. How the master sword came to be, Zelda always just being one step ahead... (cutie too icon_razz.gif)

Potatoes gonna potate.
2 years ago
Can i ask, how old are you pack of ungrateful whingers?

You people would still find a fault even if every copy came with a free BJ.
2 years ago
This was the game of the year in 2011. I actually MISS playing it. It was a fantastic achievement by Nintendo. It has restored my interested back in the Zelda universe after Twlight Princess.
2 years ago
UNICRON_75 wrote
Can i ask, how old are you pack of ungrateful whingers?

You people would still find a fault even if every copy came with a free BJ.
Blue jellybeans? i would buy this game for a free one of those.

people who didn't enjoy the game are entitled to an opinion. 9.5 is a pretty high score and you're surprised that there are people who don't agree with the score? you must be the age you think everyone else is.
2 years ago
ITT: A guy that names himself after a robot in a family friendly cartoon complains that people think a family friendly game is overrated.
2 years ago
Biggest disappointment of 2011 for me.

The whole design is tired. The recycling of assets was excruciating. The goddess trials were the worst addition to the franchise since the Temple of the Ocean King in Phantom Hourglass. The sky world was basically empty and pointless. The motion plus controls detracted from the experience due to the constant need to calibrate and the over-sensitivity of their application.

I loved the Zelda franchise. I have genuinely fond memories of each and every Zelda from the first, right up until Twilight Princess. But ever since the loathsome DS games, the franchise has become dull and uninspired. They've been void of personality, innovation, and unfortunately, the fun is completely gone as well.

Unless Shiggy gets back on board and steers the franchise back in the right direction, I won't be picking up any more Zelda games. What a shame.
2 years ago
UNICRON_75 wrote
You people would still find a fault even if every copy came with a free BJ.
The guy from EB games did offer, but he wasn't my type.

I think I've played a third of this, maybe a bit less. After 160+ hours of Skyrim, it's been a breath of fresh air. Which is not to say I can't see why this game would annoy the hell out of some people. The game does have a tendency to treat you like an idiot, which I can mostly ignore, but maybe I'm just used to it... I really have to find a new job.

The motions controls don't bother me much. The learning curve is a great deal steeper than traditional controls, which should definitely have been an option, but I'm enjoying getting the hang of them. Still, it factors into my motivation to actually play the game, because avoiding exercise seems to be a hobby of mine lately.

I'll reserve my final judgement until I actually complete the game, or it gets too repetitive to continue, or I put my shoulder out. Whichever comes first.
2 years ago
LeonJ wrote
This was the game of the year in 2011. I actually MISS playing it. It was a fantastic achievement by Nintendo. It has restored my interested back in the Zelda universe after Twlight Princess.
Here, Here!

I thought it was wonderful. icon_smile.gif
2 years ago
PALGN wrote
Furthermore, it shows that had the Wii been originally been released with Motion-Plus capabilities, the entire generation of game development could have taken a whole different course, over dodgy mini-game and waggle fests
Somehow I don't think that's the case :P

For better or worse this iteration is for the Wii market - and what we don't like to acknowledge is that there are so many new gamers that, guys, it may be time for you to graduate to games aimed at grownups.

I mean seriously, it's like complaining a Disney princess film doesn't meet your hardcore expectations, you grumpy buggers.
2 years ago
Game did not deserve a 9.5.....it deserved a 10 icon_smile.gif
Loved every second of it. I enjoyed it so mcuh I could not get myself to play anything else for a few days.
2 years ago
I liked this game.
2 years ago
AS a Zelda fan I have to say I probably enjoyed both twilight princess and phantom hourglass/spirit tracks more. Those game really had a hook about them to finish. Skyward really made me force myself to get through it.
2 years ago
Quote
I mean seriously, it's like complaining a Disney princess film doesn't meet your hardcore expectations, you grumpy buggers.
Actually I loved both Princess and the Frog and Tangled. Those movies are a show of how you can make a movie aimed at one specific demographic that's actually enjoyable for people of all ages and genders that go to see it. Hell my mum loved Tangled and she's in her 50's.

Zelda games have never really been the 'hardcore adult focused games' but the old Zelda games etc were a perfect example of how a game can be fun to kids and adults at the same time. I mean how many kids do you rekon probably started gaming with the 64? The 5 year olds playing that when it first came out would be 20 by now. The old Zelda games made when the chief demographic of gaming was 10 year olds treat their audience as being smarter then the zelda game that comes out when most people playing games are in their 30's. Does that make any sense to you?
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  Pre-order or buy:
    PALGN recommends: www.Play-Asia.com

Australian Release Date:
  20/11/2011 (Tentative)
Publisher:
  Nintendo
Genre:
  Action
Year Made:
  2011

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